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Cheeky Weekly ™ REBELLION PUBLISHING LTD, COPYRIGHT ©  REBELLION PUBLISHING LTD, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED was a British children's comic with cover dates spanning 22 October 1977 to 02 February 1980.

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Tuesday, 6 April 2021

Cheeky Annual 1980

The second Cheeky Annual, cover-dated 1980, was first advertised in Cheeky Weekly dated 22 September 1979. The weekly comic had undergone its third and final revamp in July 1979, between the publication of the 1979 Summer Special and this second Annual, and at the time of the 1980 Annual’s publication, the weekly had fewer than 6 months life ahead of it before being cancelled and merged into Whoopee!


 

Even Cheeky’s mighty molars aren’t up to the job, so our toothy pal augments his own teeth with some steel ones as he tackles Auntie Daisy’s Christmas cake. A nice painted cover by Frank McDiarmid – I like Cheeky’s expression as he endeavours to breach the concrete icing. On the inside of the cover Lily Pop offers up her lollipop sign, which has been altered to allow space for the proud owner of this Annual to inscribe their name, address and age, while a selection of the adult supporting cast (all male, of course – the 1970’s, eh?) ogle the luscious lolly lady. Another nice image in colour by Frank.

 

Barrie Appleby, who first contributed some Cheeky’s Week elements in the regular comic dated 11 March 1978, takes over the artwork duties on page 3 with a selection of chilly chuckles as we embark on January with Cheeky. It looks as though the format of the main Cheeky content in last year’s Annual (12 monthly sequences) is to be repeated. As in the previous Annual, these Cheeky page are without margins, a reminder of the page design of Cheeky’s starring feature in Krazy. During this 4-page set in colour, Petula tells our toothy pal that she will be collecting horses this year. The young animal admirer is carrying the first of her equine collection in a small box. Yes, it’s a horse chestnut. Oh dear.


 

The colour printing continues as Mustapha Million and his pal Jimmy are kidnapped at gunpoint. The villain looks remarkably similar to the confidence trickster who will dupe our moneyed mate during his Whoopee run. Crafty Mustapha employs delaying tactics, allowing the police time to trace the kidnapper’s ransom call, so despite the rather unsettling opening scenes, everything turns out ok at the conclusion of this 3-page story drawn by Joe McCaffrey who became the regular Mustapha artist in the weekly comic as of February 1979.

 

Mustapha's strip is the final colour material for the time being.

Three issues of Cheeky Weekly failed to be published in December 1978 due to industrial action. Among those missing issues is what would have been that year’s Christmas edition. However, the budget-conscious Cheeky Weekly editor was determined not to waste the material that had been intended for that festive collection of fun, so some of those strips have been used in this Annual. The first is the 3-page 6 Million Dollar Gran story that follows. I have previously posted about those held-over pages, so will be linking to the relevant posts as we progress through this Annual, thus I’ll respectfully refer you here to read about this Gran escapade. One thing that I didn’t mention in that link is the Gran strips appearing in the Summer Specials (78 and 79) and Annual (1979) published previously were all drawn by Nigel Edwards, deputising for the main Gran artist Ian Knox. From what I’ve read about artist remuneration at the time, I understand that the rates of pay for material supplied for use in Annuals and Specials were lower than those for the weekly comics. Thus some artists chose not to take on Special/Annual work, and this would seem to be the case as regards Ian Knox. This gives us another clue as to the original intended destination of this particular Gran outing.

Toni Goffe then sets readers a number of challenges in a page entitled Puzzle Patch. None of the brain teasers are Cheeky-related so this may be a reprint.

On page 13 we join Cheeky again for some February fun, including Petula’s latest horse-related joke. This 3-page monochrome sequence is drawn by Barrie Appleby.

Calculator Kid, who is up next, joined the ranks of the Cheeky Weekly features as of the issue dated 01 July 1978, evidently too late to be included in the Cheeky Annual 1979 so, although Charlie and Calc featured in the 1979 Cheeky Summer Special, this is their first Annual outing. Charlie is puzzled by Calc’s instruction to take a mouse trap to the football match. I like Terry Bave’s work on the various faces on show in this 2-page strip, and the way that the same people can be seen with different expressions as the panels progress.The chap with glasses and moustache looks to me as if he might be based on a real person.

 

The father and son duo from Why, Dad, Why? are next, and while this is a double-page set, there seem to be 2 distinct stories. The first page sees son get his dad biffed by a pugilist due to a misunderstanding over prize fighters and boxer dogs, and in the run-on story the protagonist pair find a lost pooch. There is evidence that the Why, Dad, Why? strips in Cheeky Weekly were based on scripts written for a feature of the same name that ran in Whizzer and Chips, but with new art by John Geering. The ‘2 separate stories’ nature of these WDW pages suggests that they may be based on pre-existing scripts. However, the artist here is not John Geering, the strip’s regular illustrator in Cheeky Weekly, and I’m unable to identify who it is. These pages are not reprints from Whizzer and Chips because the character designs of Dad and Son in the original run were entirely different to their resurrected counterparts.

Next is a feature entitled Dick Twerpin. A character of that name appeared in one of the Badtime Bedtime Books which ran in Monster Fun, although the highwayman featured in this Annual has a different appearance and back story to the BBB version. In this Annual story Twerpin has an encounter with Dracula. I’m not sure who the artist is here - possibly Martin Baxendale?

 


It’s an unfortunate inevitability that reprinted material will be used to pad out IPC annuals, so it’s no surprise to see a Ringer Dinger escapade, retrieved from the annals of Whizzer and Chips, on the next page. Dinger reprints had previously appeared in the 1978 and 1979 Cheeky Summer Specials and the 1979 Cheeky Annual so the telephonic tribulations of the titular tyke are familiar to fans of the toothy funster. The extra space that results from the different page ratio between the strip’s original Whizzer and Chips home and the Annual has been filled by expanding the title banner and adding rows of stars, thus avoiding the need for resizing the artwork.

 

Art: Terry Bave

The dusty archive of vintage Shiver and Shake pages is then raided to provide a reprint of Biddy’s Beastly Bloomers. Biddy and the herbaceous horrors had previously been resuscitated to make 3 appearances in in the 1979 Cheeky Annual. In order to prevent resizing of the artwork, a new title banner has been added, and an image of the heroine and one of her plant adversaries replaces the original title panel.

Art: Sid Burgon

The sure paws of Goalie Cat pluck Cheeky’s can-shot from the air at the commencement of Cheeky's March (the feline footballer appeared at the beginning of February in the 1979 Cheeky Annual). Barrie Appleby provides the art on this 3-page sequence.

Pages 30 and 31 are occupied by 2 seemingly identical illustrations depicting 6 Million Dollar Gran doing what the accompanying caption describes as ‘a bit of bionic ski-ing’ (the mis-description of Gran, a robot, as being bionic wasn’t limited to the regular comic). Readers are challenged to identify 12 differences between the two images. Nigel Edwards is the artist and, like his illustrations for the Gran Spot The Difference in the 1979 Cheeky Summer Special (12 differences), other than Pete and Pauline Potts, none of the Krazy Town crew are on view in this wintry scene although the legend ‘Cheeky woz here’ has been carved on one of the tree trunks that Gran is using as skis.

Jimmy Hansen then delivers a 2 page Speed Squad story which pits the intrepid trio against the Grease Gang who, having equipped their cartie with a Jolly Roger, mount a piratical raid on our high-speed heroes. Speed Squad had replaced Skateboard Squad as of Cheeky Weekly dated 26 May 1979. Thus Skipper is seen on a pair of roller skates while Skatie and Wipe-Out travel on (rather small) skateboards.

2 pages of single panel gags featuring Cheeky Weekly’s dithering dunderhead and entitled Paddywack at Large then follow, drawn by regular artist Jack Clayton.

There’s more communication confusion for Ringer Dinger on page 36, as he dials up a curler to replace one of his mum’s hairdressing implements. A gent appears with brush and stone then proceed to slide the heavy object across the lino. The strip is padded out with an enlarged banner and stars as was the earlier Dinger story.

Copy Kate, who as of the 1979 Cheeky Summer Special joined the roster of reprints employed to occupy some of the the pages of the Cheeky spinoff titles without unduly straining the editor's budget (she replaced Bam Splat and Blooie and Cocky Doodle), then makes her Cheeky Annual debut. Her escapade has not been resized but the blank space surrounding the strip has been filled with Letratone. She's given the dignity of a title panel, something which was denied her on 2 occasions in the '79 Summer Special.

 

Art: Tom Williams

Cheeky’s 3-page April set begins with our toothy pal meeting Gloomy Glad, followed by the usual collection of corny gags with a selection of his Krazy Town chums.

There then follows a strip headed Creepy Sleepy Tales. Creepy Sleepy Tale was of course a feature that ran from the first issue of Cheeky Weekly until that dated 26 August 1978. However, the strip presented here under the sub-title Jack the Nipper is in fact a reprint of the first Badtime Bedtime Storybook from Monster Fun, which originally carried the title Jack the Nipper’s Schooldays. This 8 page feature included artist Leo Baxendale’s signature in the final panel on its original outing but the artwork has been altered here, obliterating Leo’s moniker - compare the monochrome reprint from the Annual below, with the original.


Bicycle bother causes Dinger to ring for a new spoke, but the inevitable dial-up disaster causes a ‘new spook’ to manifest itself. Those of us who appreciate consistency in the preparation of our Annual contents will be frustrated by this page as the 3 rows of stars which were apparent on the 2 preceding Dinger sets are omitted from this one.

There are spooky aspects to the Calculator Kid story which occupies pages 50 and 51, but only insofar as the artwork is ‘ghosted’ by someone other than regular illustrator Terry Bave. I’m unable to identify the originator of the drawings on this tale (I think it's the same artist who drew the earlier Why, Dad, Why?) concerning Charlie’s desire for a ride on a steam train.


 

Copy Kate follows, and she’s diddled out of the 50p with which she was intending to pay for a go-kart session. The course of the story sees another use of the Pheeeugh! exclamation which seems to be peculiar to this feature (it was evident in 2 Kate strips in the 1979 Cheeky Summer Special). Kate’s strip is again surrounded by Letratone as was her earlier adventure.

The pestilential plants are back on page 53 as Biddy’s neighbour’s dog food is targeted by the greedy greenery.

3 pages of May mirth with Cheeky and pals ensues, following which colour printing resumes with a page featuring Tub, which I suspect was originally intended for the aborted issue of Cheeky Weekly that should have carried a cover date of 23 December 1978. The strip retains the Mystery Comic title (but trimmed slightly to allow the strip to fit the Annual page better), although the last issue of Cheeky Weekly to feature the Mystery Comic framing device was dated 30 June 1979. Nigel Edwards is the artist, but that’s no surprise because he drew all the Tub episodes in the regular comic.

Tub’s erstwhile Mystery Comic colleagues, the inquisitive Son and put-upon Dad duo of Why, Dad, Why? then embark on an escapade concerning the fixing of various household squeaks. This 2-pager is rendered in colour by regular artist John Geering. The colour continues as Terry Bave delivers a 2 page Calculator Kid tale in which our heroes, plus Charlie’s pal Tony, get caught in a blizzard while on a country hike. Unfortunately, this wintry tale is at odds with the May to June section of the Annual into which it has been placed. Anyway, needless to say Calc has a plan to summon assistance. The 'creating a message in the snow' idea is one which Terry Bave revisited in his script for the CK story that appeared in Whoopee! and Cheeky dated 31 January 1981.

Cheeky Annual 1980

 

Whoopee! and Cheeky 31 January 1981

Coombe Bay is the destination of James Bold and Angel O’Mercy and their intention is a quiet holiday. The placement of this vacation-related tale between Cheeky’s May and June sequences is therefore appropriate. Intrigued by stories of the ghostly sailor said to haunt the nearby lighthouse, Bold rows out to the forbidding illumination tower along with Angel who seems not to share her male companion’s enthusiasm for the investigation. From the top of the lighthouse the duo espy a ghost on the beach. Further spooky goings-on are evident when the intrepid duo investigate the local manor house. In keeping with the standard James Bold storyline, which regular readers of the toothy funster's comic have experienced on a number of occasions. the supposedly supernatural events turn out to be (spoiler alert) entirely of human devising, in this case a ruse to distract from a diamond-smuggling operation. The artist on this 8 page, colour Bold adventure is one I’m unable to identify. Unlike Bold's adventure in the previous Annual, this one is not given an individual title.

The ‘eerie happenings on holiday’ theme continues, although in a humorous vein this time, as another Creepy Sleepy Tale(s) unfolds, concerning an unnamed gent who is haunted by a ghostly set of bagpipes. Paul Ailey provides the visuals for this 3 pager in colour. Unlike the Creepy Sleepy Tale(s) earlier in this Annual, this one doesn’t appear to be a reprint of a Badtime Bedtime Story/Book, so I’m assuming it is an original feature.

 


Page 73 sees printing return to monochrome as Cheeky embarks 3 pages of June japes with the usual Krazy Town crew. Barrie Appleby owns up to not knowing what the rarely-seen-in-Cheeky-Weekly Claude’s mum looks like.


 

Immediately following the June sequence is a 4-page set entitled The Girls which focuses on certain of the female members of Cheeky’s supporting cast. A feature with (almost) the same title and premise appeared in the 1979 Cheeky Annual, although on that occasion the word Girls in the title was enclosed in quotation marks, another frustration for those of us seeking consistency in their reading material. It also poses a problem when I'm recording this feature in my comics database, as two versions of a title for what is the same feature could lead to me missing one if forget the variants when formulating a database query, so I have decided to record the title of this strip as The "Girls". Barrie Appleby draws this year’s strip.

Copy Kate is at the circus on the next page, surrounded once again by Letratone.

Snail stars in the following feature entitled, not very imaginatively, Snail. Cheeky’s mollusc mate secured his own regular feature, Snail of the Century, in Cheeky Weekly dated 14 July 1979, and this set in the Annual follows the format of the weekly strip, with the gastropod gagster leaving his toothy chum indoors before slithering into the garden to engage in banter with the local wildlife. This 4 page sequence is drawn by Frank McDiarmid.

The focus then returns to our toothy pal as he commences 3 pages of July with Cheeky, and the forthcoming holiday destinations of a number of Krazy Town folk provide the subjects for the gags.

Paddywack is At Large with another selection of funnies on pages 88 and 89, following which Speed Squad are involved in that oft-used scenario – the takings being snatched from a local business. This time sweet shop proprietor Miss Adams is mugged by a thief disguised as Dracula. By the conclusion of this 2 pager the vampiric miscreant has been apprehended by the titular trio, who are seen travelling on roller skates (Skipper and Skatie this time) and skateboard (Wipe-Out).

Art: Jimmy Hansen

 

Further nefarious deeds are afoot as a gang of crooks lure Disaster Des to wait outside a bank, hoping to snatch some cash when the inevitable chaos ensues. Needless to say, things don’t work out the way they planned in this 2 page set by regular Des artist Mike Lacey. This is Des' first Annual appearance, although he did appear in the 1979 Cheeky Summer Special, the junior jinx having made his debut in Cheeky Weekly dated 30 September 1978.

 

Cheeky is on a seaside holiday with his mum and dad in August, and as we have come to expect, several of the toothy funster’s chums are also enjoying some leisure time in the same location. Much to Cheeky’s annoyance, Teacher gets to tell all the jokes, but our grinning pal has the last laugh as he persuades Lily Pop to take him on her tandem, a seat that the podgy pedagogue was hoping to secure for himself.

Two reprint pages follow - Dinger is concerned that his phone isn’t working when he dials for the Loch Ness Monster, but Nessie materialises in the bath, where the telephonic tyke’s dad is enjoying a soak. The 3 rows of stars have been reinstated for this strip. Then we learn that one of the 3 Beastly Bloomers is known to the other two as Percy during the course of the Biddy strip on page 98, when the pesky plants raid the baker’s van.

The rare sight of a glum toothy chum, emerging from the first day back at school, kicks off the September with Cheeky 3-pager, after which a 2-page Why, Dad, Why? is drawn by the same artist who drew Calculator Kid on pages 50 and 51 and who I’m still unable to identify. Which is unfortunate as the same illustrator delivers another Calculator Kid 2 page escapade immediately overleaf. Like Copy Kate’s adventure on page 52, this Calculator Kid story concerns a lost 50 pence piece.

 


Paddywack, whose early Cheeky Weekly appearances were metatextual in that he was depicted as a character drawn by Doodle Doug, although he later crossed the reality boundary, is seen with Doug on the streets of Krazy Town during October with Cheeky.

Copy Kate decides to mimic the members of a brass band, using household objects, after which we return to the streets of Krazy Town as it’s already November and, to fend of the chill, Cheeky is sporting a new jumper knitted by Granny Gumdrop. During this 3 page set by Barrie Appleby, Goalie Cat seems to develop the power of speech as he vocalises the punch line to his gag rather than thinking it as he usually does in the regular comic. As this sequence concludes, Cheeky is reminded by the Vicar of his promise to write the script for the forthcoming pantomime. A caption informs us that the pantomime will start on page 121, but the bottom of the Vicar’s final speech balloon is cut off by the edge of the page due to the marginless page design.

As Krazy Town gears up for the seasonal festivities, the editor has chosen an appropriate, if not specifically Christmas-related, Ringer Dinger story for page 113. It revolves around Dinger’s dilemma over what costume he should choose to wear to the fancy dress party. A book of nursery rhymes inspires the young hero to dial ‘Old King Cole’, and those of us expecting the manifestation of a coal miner are surprised that for once the telecommunication technology actually delivers the mythical aged regal personage. Swapping garb with the merry old soul, Dinger attends the party but doesn’t win the prize for best costume.

A festive Calculator Kid tale follows, in a page that I believe would have originally appeared in Cheeky Weekly dated 30 December 1978, had it been published.

Immediately following is a seasonal Why, Dad, Why? which I suspect was originally intended to appear within the Mystery Comic section of the aborted Cheeky Weekly 30December 1978 edition.

Whereas the held-over Calculator Kid and Why, Dad, Why? Strips featured on the 2 previous pages were not resized, the Disaster Des strip printed on page 116 of this Annual, another originally intended for the Christmas issue of the toothy funster’s regular comic, has been altered to expand it.

Copy Kate’s peculiar ‘Pheeugh! is then again in evidence as she meddles with some road-menders’ equipment.

It would seem that the compilers of IPC’s Summer Specials and Annuals were obliged to include at least one ‘Spot the Difference/Similarities’ feature in each publication, probably because it was a cheap way of filling space by printing what was essentially the same image twice. Having already had our powers of observation tested by a 6 Million Dollar Gran Spot the Difference, pages 118 and 119 contain two seemingly identical illustrations of clowns in a circus ring, drawn by Cliff Brown but unsigned. There are 12 differences (why always 12? Was there some contractual stipulation that if an artist made more than 12 alterations, the second image would be considered an entirely new drawing and thus attract a higher rate of pay?)

An excited Tub then rushes to open his Christmas presents in another hold-over from the lost Christmas 1978 Cheeky Weekly.

Colour returns to the pages of the Cheeky Annual 1980 on page 121 as we commence December with Cheeky, which is devoted to the pantomime promised earlier in the book. This sequence by Barrie Appleby is the longest of all the Cheeky sets in this Annual at 7 pages, and brings the book to a suitably festive finish – the back cover being a duplicate of the front with no, as far as I can tell, differences.

 


 


This Annual consists of 128 pages, the same number as the Cheeky Annual 1979. Both contain 32 colour pages, including the covers, with the multichromatic pages occurring in the same locations (front cover to page 8, pages 57 to 72 and pages 121 to 128). 12 colour pages in last year's Annual were allocated to Cheeky (his 4-pages-each January, June, and December with Cheeky sequences), whereas this year our toothy pal enjoys only 10 colour pages (January (3 pages) and December (7 pages) with Cheeky). The 12-months-with-Cheeky format of the majority of the Cheeky-related content is the same as last year, although the whole of December in this year's Annual is devoted to the Krazy Town pantomime which makes a refreshing change from the familiar strolling-the-streets structure of the rest of the monthly episodes. Barrie Appleby provides 44 pages of Cheeky fun for this year's Annual. Last year Jim Petrie delivered 52 excellent pages of Cheeky material, and when reviewing that book I said that Jim was probably my favourite artist on Cheeky after Frank McDiarmid, but I must say that Barrie does a superb job and I think I'll have to put Barrie alongside Jim as my favourite two artists to deputise for Frank. In his review here, Irmantas notes that Barrie Appleby's expected contributions to the 1980 Monster Fun Annual were not present, and Barrie's workload on this Cheeky Annual explains his absence from the MF Annual. It would seem that the editor has a policy in relation to the Cheeky Annuals of allocating all the Cheeky material other than that drawn by Frank McDiarmid, who clearly was unable to contribute more to the Annuals due to his heavy commitments to the weekly comic, to a single artist. The regular comic often included several different artists on the Cheeky's Week elements in a single issue and I think that doing the same in the Annual would have given it a fragmented, less cohesive feel. It's great that Frank did get to illustrate the covers as well as This Book Belongs To and the 4-page Snail.

As mentioned above, reprinted material was an unavoidable hazard of IPC Annuals, and this year the Cheeky Annual contained 16.41% recycled elements, up from 12.31% in last year's. The Annual price has increased from £1.10 to £1.25 for the same number of pages, an increase of 13.63%, commensurate with average annual inflation for 1979 which is 13.35%.

Copy Kate joins the reprints in an Annual for the first time this year, having made her debut as filler in the 1979 Cheeky Summer Special. In the case of the '80 Annual, Kate was recruited to replace fellow resurrectees Cocky Doodle and Bam Splat and Blooie, whose final outings were in the Cheeky Annual 1979. The cessation of the ravenous rooster and frantic dog, cat and bird antics was possibly because their reprint runs in Cheeky Weekly had terminated by summer 1978, or it may have been that the editor had exhausted all the available material in the IPC archives. Also failing to squelch into this Annual is Soggy the Sea Monster, whose reprinted adventures were included in the Cheeky Summer Special 1978, Cheeky Annual 1979 and Cheeky Summer Special 1979. It's definitely not the case that the editor had used all the Soggy episodes mouldering within the dank catacombs below King's Reach Tower, as the silly sea serpent would help fill the pages of future Cheeky Annuals, Specials and the weekly comic.

 

In the following comparisons between features concurrently running in Cheeky Weekly and the Cheeky Annual 1980, I have assumed a publication date of 01 September 1979 for the Annual.


Cheeky Annual 1980 Features Currently running in Cheeky Weekly
Cheeky Annual 1980 Feature Cheeky Weekly Dates
Mustapha Million22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
Why, Dad, Why?30-Sep-78 to 02-Feb-80
Calculator Kid01-Jul-78 to 02-Feb-80
Tub30-Sep-78 to 02-Feb-80
Disaster Des30-Sep-78 to 02-Feb-80
Speed Squad26-May-79 to 02-Feb-80
6 Million Dollar Gran22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80

Features Currently running in Cheeky Weekly but not in Cheeky Annual 1980
Cheeky Weekly Feature Cheeky Weekly Dates
Chit-Chat09-Dec-78 to 02-Feb-80
Cover Feature22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
Elephant On The Run30-Sep-78 to 02-Feb-80
Friday22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
Giant Cheeky Poster18-Aug-79 to 08-Sep-79
Joke-Box Jury10-Dec-77 to 02-Feb-80
Monday22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
Mystery Boy30-Sep-78 to 13-Oct-79
Paddywack08-Jul-78 to 26-Jan-80
Saturday22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
Silly Snaps02-Sep-78 to 20-Oct-79
Snail of the Century14-Jul-79 to 02-Feb-80
Stage School07-Jul-79 to 02-Feb-80
Sunday22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
Tease Break17-Feb-79 to 03-Nov-79
The Gang07-Jul-79 to 02-Feb-80
Thursday22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
Tuesday22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
Wednesday22-Oct-77 to 02-Feb-80
What's New, Kids22-Oct-77 to 17-Nov-79


Cheeky Annual 1980 Features ending earlier in Cheeky Weekly
Cheeky Annual 1980 Feature Cheeky Weekly Dates
Creepy Sleepy Tale22-Oct-77 to 26-Aug-78
James Bold22-Oct-77 to 05-Aug-78


Cheeky Annual 1980 Features running later in Cheeky Weekly
Cheeky Annual 1980 Feature Cheeky Weekly Dates
6 Million Dollar Gran Spot the Difference19-Jan-80 to 19-Jan-80
Ringer Dinger06-Oct-79 to 02-Feb-80
Note the 6 Million Dollar Gran Spot the Difference in the weekly was not the same as in the Annual.

Cheeky Annual 1980 Features never running in Cheeky Weekly
Cheeky Annual 1980 Feature
April with Cheeky
August with Cheeky
Back Cover
Biddy's Beastly Bloomers
Comic Changes
Copy Kate
Cover
December with Cheeky
Dick Twerpin
February with Cheeky
January with Cheeky
July with Cheeky
June with Cheeky
March with Cheeky
May with Cheeky
November with Cheeky
October with Cheeky
Paddywack at Large
Puzzle Patch
September with Cheeky
Snail
The Girls
This Book Belongs To


Cheeky Annual 1980 Reprint Feature Elements by %
Total Feature Elements Original Feature Elements Reprint Feature Elements Reprint %
1281072116.41

 

Features in previous Cheeky Annual not appearing in Cheeky Annual 1980

Title
Feature
Cheeky Annual 1979 All Snails Are Alike?
Cheeky Annual 1979 Baby Burpo Strikes
Cheeky Annual 1979 Baby Burpo Strikes Again
Cheeky Annual 1979 Bam Splat and Blooie
Cheeky Annual 1979 Cartoon Gallery
Cheeky Annual 1979 Cocky Doodle
Cheeky Annual 1979 Double Trouble
Cheeky Annual 1979 Home Movie
Cheeky Annual 1979 Moon Loon
Cheeky Annual 1979 Skateboard Squad
Cheeky Annual 1979 Soggy the Sea Monster
Cheeky Annual 1979 The Doors Are Open
Cheeky Annual 1979 The Robot Olympics
Cheeky Annual 1979 Tim'll Fix It



Features in Cheeky Annual 1980 not appearing in Cheeky Annual 1979
Cheeky Annual 1980 6 Million Dollar Gran Spot the Difference
Cheeky Annual 1980 Calculator Kid
Cheeky Annual 1980 Comic Changes
Cheeky Annual 1980 Copy Kate
Cheeky Annual 1980 Dick Twerpin
Cheeky Annual 1980 Disaster Des
Cheeky Annual 1980 Paddywack at Large
Cheeky Annual 1980 Puzzle Patch
Cheeky Annual 1980 Snail
Cheeky Annual 1980 Speed Squad
Cheeky Annual 1980 Tub
Cheeky Annual 1980 Why, Dad, Why?
 
Features in Cheeky Annuals 1979 and 1980
Cheeky Annual 1979 6 Million Dollar Gran Cheeky Annual 1980 6 Million Dollar Gran
Cheeky Annual 1979 April with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 April with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 August with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 August with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 Back Cover Cheeky Annual 1980 Back Cover
Cheeky Annual 1979 Biddy's Beastly Bloomers Cheeky Annual 1980 Biddy's Beastly Bloomers
Cheeky Annual 1979 Cover Cheeky Annual 1980 Cover
Cheeky Annual 1979 Creepy Sleepy Tale Cheeky Annual 1980 Creepy Sleepy Tale
Cheeky Annual 1979 December with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 December with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 February with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 February with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 James Bold Cheeky Annual 1980 James Bold
Cheeky Annual 1979 January with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 January with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 July with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 July with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 June with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 June with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 March with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 March with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 May with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 May with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 Mustapha Million Cheeky Annual 1980 Mustapha Million
Cheeky Annual 1979 November with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 November with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 October with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 October with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 Ringer Dinger Cheeky Annual 1980 Ringer Dinger
Cheeky Annual 1979 September with Cheeky Cheeky Annual 1980 September with Cheeky
Cheeky Annual 1979 The "Girls" Cheeky Annual 1980 The "Girls"
Cheeky Annual 1979 This Book Belongs To Cheeky Annual 1980 This Book Belongs To



 



Cheeky Annual 1980 - published September 1979
Page Details
1Cover 'Christmas Cake' - Art Frank McDiarmid
2This Book Belongs To 'Lily Pop' - Art Frank McDiarmid
3January with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
4January with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
5January with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
6Mustapha Million - Art Joe McCaffrey
7Mustapha Million - Art Joe McCaffrey
8Mustapha Million - Art Joe McCaffrey
96 Million Dollar Gran - Art Ian Knox
106 Million Dollar Gran - Art Ian Knox
116 Million Dollar Gran - Art Ian Knox
12Puzzle Patch - Art Toni Goffe
13February with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
14February with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
15February with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
16Calculator Kid - Art Terry Bave
17Calculator Kid - Art Terry Bave
18Why, Dad, Why?
19Why, Dad, Why?
20Dick Twerpin
21Dick Twerpin
22Dick Twerpin
23Dick Twerpin
24Dick Twerpin
25Ringer Dinger reprint from Whizzer and Chips - Art Terry Bave
26Biddy's Beastly Bloomers reprint from Shiver and Shake - Art Sid Burgon
27March with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
28March with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
29March with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
306 Million Dollar Gran Spot the Difference - Art Nigel Edwards
316 Million Dollar Gran Spot the Difference - Art Nigel Edwards
32Speed Squad - Art Jimmy Hansen
33Speed Squad - Art Jimmy Hansen
34Paddywack at Large - Art Jack Clayton
35Paddywack at Large - Art Jack Clayton
36Ringer Dinger reprint from Whizzer and Chips - Art Terry Bave
37Copy Kate reprint from Knockout (IPC) - Art Tom Williams
38April with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
39April with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
40April with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
41Creepy Sleepy Tale reprint from Monster Fun - Art Leo Baxendale
42Creepy Sleepy Tale reprint from Monster Fun - Art Leo Baxendale
43Creepy Sleepy Tale reprint from Monster Fun - Art Leo Baxendale
44Creepy Sleepy Tale reprint from Monster Fun - Art Leo Baxendale
45Creepy Sleepy Tale reprint from Monster Fun - Art Leo Baxendale
46Creepy Sleepy Tale reprint from Monster Fun - Art Leo Baxendale
47Creepy Sleepy Tale reprint from Monster Fun - Art Leo Baxendale
48Creepy Sleepy Tale reprint from Monster Fun - Art Leo Baxendale
49Ringer Dinger reprint from Whizzer and Chips - Art Terry Bave
50Calculator Kid
51Calculator Kid
52Copy Kate reprint from Knockout (IPC) - Art Tom Williams
53Biddy's Beastly Bloomers reprint from Shiver and Shake - Art Sid Burgon
54May with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
55May with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
56May with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
57Tub - Art Nigel Edwards
58Why, Dad, Why? - Art John K. Geering
59Why, Dad, Why? - Art John K. Geering
60Calculator Kid - Art Terry Bave
61Calculator Kid - Art Terry Bave
62James Bold
63James Bold
64James Bold
65James Bold
66James Bold
67James Bold
68James Bold
69James Bold
70Creepy Sleepy Tale
71Creepy Sleepy Tale
72Creepy Sleepy Tale
73June with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
74June with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
75June with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
76The "Girls" - Art Barrie Appleby
77The "Girls" - Art Barrie Appleby
78The "Girls" - Art Barrie Appleby
79The "Girls" - Art Barrie Appleby
80Copy Kate reprint from Knockout (IPC) - Art Tom Williams
81Snail - Art Frank McDiarmid
82Snail - Art Frank McDiarmid
83Snail - Art Frank McDiarmid
84Snail - Art Frank McDiarmid
85July with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
86July with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
87July with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
88Paddywack at Large - Art Jack Clayton
89Paddywack at Large - Art Jack Clayton
90Speed Squad - Art Jimmy Hansen
91Speed Squad - Art Jimmy Hansen
92Disaster Des - Art Mike Lacey
93Disaster Des - Art Mike Lacey
94August with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
95August with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
96August with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
97Ringer Dinger reprint from Whizzer and Chips - Art Terry Bave
98Biddy's Beastly Bloomers reprint from Shiver and Shake - Art Sid Burgon
99September with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
100August with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
101August with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
102Why, Dad, Why?
103Why, Dad, Why?
104Calculator Kid
105Calculator Kid
106October with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
107October with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
108October with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
109Copy Kate reprint from Knockout (IPC) - Art Tom Williams
110November with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
111November with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
112November with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
113Ringer Dinger reprint from Whizzer and Chips - Art Terry Bave
114Calculator Kid - Art Terry Bave
115Why, Dad, Why? - Art John K. Geering
116Disaster Des - Art Mike Lacey
117Copy Kate reprint from Knockout (IPC) - Art Tom Williams
118Comic Changes - Art Cliff Brown
119Comic Changes - Art Cliff Brown
120Tub - Art Nigel Edwards
121December with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
122December with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
123December with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
124December with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
125December with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
126December with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
127December with Cheeky - Art Barrie Appleby
128Back Cover 'Christmas Cake' - Art Frank McDiarmid