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Welcome to the Cheeky Weekly blog! Cheeky Weekly ™ REBELLION PUBLISHING LTD, COPYRIGHT ©  REBELLION PUBLISHING LTD, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED was a British children's comic with cover dates spanning 22 October 1977 to 02 February 1980.

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Wednesday, 26 September 2018

Whizzer and Chips - The Cheeky Raids part 35

New readers start here... After Cheeky Weekly folded and was incorporated into Whoopee as of February 1980 six strips that had originated in the toothy funster's title survived the merge and continued to appear in the amalgamated comic. Whoopee itself foundered in March 1985 and was merged into Whizzer and Chips. Three of the surviving Cheeky Weekly strips successfully negotiated this second merge and went on to appear in the newly combined publication, rather inelegantly titled 'Whizzer and Chips now including Whoopee'. The survivors were Mustapha Million, Calculator Kid and (appearing only twice) Stage School. Cheeky continued to appear, but as a member of The Krazy Gang, who had moved into W&C when Krazy, the comic in which the Gang originated, expired in April 1978. However, the Krazy Gang's Whizzer and Chips run ended in the issue dated 08 February 1986. Calculator Kid survived a little longer, his run of reprints coming to an end in the 26 July 1986 edition and leaving Mustapha Million as the sole Cheeky Weekly survivor.


Concerns about the amount of time kids spend looking at screens have probably existed since magic lanterns first radiated their beguiling beams across well-to-do 18th century living rooms. Mustapha's story in Whizzer and Chips dated 20 June 1987 takes 20th century screen-time worries as its kicking-off point. During the tale, in which our middle eastern pal demonstrates a typically Mustapharian misunderstanding of British phraseology, a wily Whizz-kid manages to infiltrate the proceedings. Can you spot the trespasser? Answer below...

Whizzer and Chips 20 June 1987
Art: Barry Glennard












Yes, it's that plaything-preoccupied pipsqueak, Toy Boy, who had previously raided Mustapha in Whizzer and Chips dated 06 December 1986. Unfortunately, the intensely annoying 'I made a mug of Mustapha Million' slogan now seems to have become permanent. It's just not cricket (sorry).

Whizzer and Chips Cover Date Raider Raided
06 April 1985Mustapha MillionSuper Steve
04 May 1985Bloggs (Store Wars)Mustapha Million
11 May 1985JokerThe Krazy Gang (Cheeky)
18 May 1985Calculator Kid & CalcOdd-Ball
01 June 1985
Animalad
Mustapha Million
The Krazy Gang (Cheeky)
Boy Boss
08 June 1985Odd-BallCalculator Kid
06 July 1985Toy BoyCalculator Kid
13 July 1985Pa BumpkinThe Krazy Gang (Cheeky)
27 July 1985JokerMustapha Million
24 August 1985CheekySid's Snake
14 September 1985
Odd-Ball
Calculator Kid
Calculator Kid
Store Wars
05 October 1985Mustapha MillionAnimalad
19 October 1985Odd-BallMustapha Million
23 November 1985
Sweeny Toddler
Sweeny Toddler
Sweeny Toddler
Calculator Kid
The Krazy Gang (Cheeky)
Mustapha Million
18 January 1986Mustapha MillionSuper Steve
25 January 1986
Odd-Ball
Cheeky
Mustapha Million
Odd-Ball
08 February 1986
The Krazy Gang ends this issue
AnimaladMustapha Million
15 February 1986Lazy BonesCalculator Kid
15 March 1986Odd-BallCalculator Kid
29 March 1986Calculator KidMaster P Brain
05 April 1986Bumpkin BillionairesMustapha Million
12 April 1986AnimaladCalculator Kid
31 May 1986Lazy BonesCalculator Kid
07 June 1986Mustapha MillionJoker
28 June 1986Sweet ToothMustapha Million
26 July 1986
Calculator Kid ends this issue
No Cheeky-related raid this issueNo Cheeky-related raid this issue
16 August 1986Mustapha MillionJoker
23 August 1986Sweet ToothMustapha Million
18 October 1986Winnie the Royal NagMustapha Million
06 December 1986Toy BoyMustapha Million
13 December 1986Mustapha MillionOdd-Ball
17 January 1987SidMustapha Million
14 February 1987Odd-BallMustapha Million
11 April 1987Pa BumpkinMustapha Million
25 April 1987Mustapha MillionOdd-Ball
20 June 1987Toy BoyMustapha Million

4 comments:

  1. What makes the description of Mustapha as a drinking vessel even more galling is that it's drawn and lettered by Jack Oliver, who'd literally made a career out of drawing AND SCRIPTING his own material. You've only got to look at his IPC output (Robin Good, Cliff Hanger, etc) to see this. And here he's jumped on someone else's bandwagon. RIP Jack - even if you did sell out. ;-)

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    1. I know your comment is tongue-in-cheek but yes, Jack is a legend and to be fair his trademark imagination/sense of fun is in evidence on the Whizz-kid and Chip-ite pages that he illustrated (e.g. the ceramic mug you mentioned), it's just a bit watered down given the constraints of illustrating what was essentially a letters page. He could have just done the minimum required but he clearly put a bit of thought and effort into making the pages fun. I did actually toy (if you'll pardon the pun) with the idea of posting the whole of that particular Whizz-kid page but decided against it. Can't blame him for taking the letters page gig when he was offered it, or maybe he proposed to the editor that he could enliven the pages.

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  2. I’m glad you took my comments in the sense they were meant; I’d never insult Jack. He probably did have to follow some editorial policy or other, and the letters page was a handy canvas for his style. Soon enough there’d not be that many, so it’s likely economics came into it. Jack being Jack (and unlike Peter Grey I never met the man) he couldn’t help but bring his own flair and fun to it – with superb results.

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    Replies
    1. There is one particular artist on the IPC comics (not going to name them) that whenever I see their work I think 'you've done the absolute minimum required - you've taken the script, illustrated it, but put no effort into enlivening it by even making the drawings funny'. The greats such as Leo B, Ken R, Frank McD particularly on Cheeky, Tom P and JEO expended such effort in their creations that the pages just zing with life. Rant over - goodnight.

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