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Welcome to the Cheeky Weekly blog!
Cheeky Weekly ™ REBELLION PUBLISHING LTD, COPYRIGHT ©  REBELLION PUBLISHING LTD, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED was a British children's comic with cover dates spanning 22 October 1977 to 02 February 1980.

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Wednesday, 18 August 2010

George, Mildred and Cheeky

'Now if I can just get the badge off before the director sees me...'
I've superimposed the comic cover for comparison
Jumble Pie, the first episode of the second series of the TV sitcom George and Mildred, was originally broadcast on 14 November 1977.  The plot involves George's 'artistic' magazines (with titles like 'Nudge', 'Wink' and 'Titter') being given by mistake to the Vicar's jumble sale. In the jumble sale sequence we see Tristram, the son of George and Mildred's neighbours, looking at a pile of comics.  On top of the pile is a copy of Cheeky Weekly dated 05 November 1977. While waiting to deliver his lines, Tristram (played by Nicholas Bond-Owen) can be seen trying to remove the badge from the cover of the comic (not sure if that was scripted or young Nicholas was just trying to snaffle the freebie).  He then asks his dad if he can buy them.

Luckily (or unluckily for Tristram, maybe) the young lad doesn't get hold of George's mucky reading material, which is in a box with gardening magazines on top.  Tristram's dad uncovers the stash of nudies and denounces it as filth, which should be banned.

Of course, in the final scene, the mags are found on top of Tristram's dad's wardrobe.

2 comments:

  1. Man About The House was a classic British TV series. When it ended and 'George and Mildred' (also stars of the previous show) landed their own TV series; it opened a whole new world to the antics of George Roper for his fans. I am so glad they maintained his character and quirks into this show. Changing that in any other way would have been a failure. I was also so glad to see Robin continue on with his new series "Robin's Nest" and a great success it was also. Shows how talented they were as actors and the writers for producing 3 classics that will never grow old!

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  2. I agree MATH and GaM were classic shows - I have them both on DVD. I really must get RN as well.

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