Welcome to the Cheeky Weekly blog!


Welcome to the Cheeky Weekly blog!
Cheeky Weekly ™ REBELLION PUBLISHING LTD, COPYRIGHT ©  REBELLION PUBLISHING LTD, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED was a British children's comic with cover dates spanning 22 October 1977 to 02 February 1980.

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Sunday, 26 July 2020

Brian Walker RIP

downthetubes is reporting the sad news that Brian Walker has passed away. Brian's unmistakable and highly appealing style graced many comics, including Cheeky Weekly, where he worked in collaboration with Barrie Appleby on Laugh and Learn. My condolences to Brian's family and friends.

4 comments:

  1. Sad news. His self-portrait looked like his W&C character Old Boy, and he was probably aware of it; let’s hope not bitterly so. RIP Brian.

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    1. Old Boy is a good strip. I always imagine the ancient school pupil speaking in the voice of Harbottle from the Will Hay films.

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  2. Interesting. I’m exceedingly fond of these films, so it’s surprising I didn’t make the Harbottle connection. Or not at all, if I’m thick or whatever. BTW Harbottle was part of Hay’s stage act for years before Moore Marriott came along.

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    1. I don't know much about Hay, but I believe his stage act was a 'schoolmaster and pupils' setup. I wonder if 'Harbottle' appeared as a pupil in his old man character, and that was the inspiration for Old Boy (some of the Whizzer and Chips staff of the time would probably have been of an age to be aware of the old music hall acts). I recently saw Hay's film 'Those Were The Days', a farce in which he gives a more restrained performance than in his more famous films, and is without Harbottle and Albert. I enjoyed it, though.

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